bri's blurbs
unexplained-events:

unexplained-events:

Autoimmune Disease Acts Like Demonic Possession
Susannah Cahalan started feeling a bit off. Numbness on one side of the body, losing sleep, crying hysterically one minute and laughing the next. She went to get MRIs but they showed nothing. Things were getting a bit more strange.
Her boyfriend told her how at one point while they were watching a show together she started grinding her teeth, moaning, and biting her tongue until she finally passed out. He took her to the hospital and they found out it was a seizure. Her first of many. Things got worse.
She stopped eating, became paranoid and delusional, had more seizures in which blood would spurt out of her mouth. She was hospitalized (one nurse recalls that in the middle of the night while she was getting blood, Susannah sat up straigh and slapped her). Numerous tests were done and the doctors couldn’t figure out what was wrong.
That is until Dr. Souhel Najjar came into the picture. He asked her to draw a clock. When she showed him what she had drawn he knew exactly what was wrong with her. All the numbers were written on the right side of the clock face, and no numbers were on the left side.
She had anti-NMDAR encephalitis. The receptors in the frontal lobe, responsible for cognitive reasoning, and the limbic system, or the emotional center of the brain, are under assault by the immune system. In other words, her body was attacking her brain. Nearly 90% of people that suffer from this go undiagnosed and it is more common in women.
SOURCE
SOURCE

Oh, and she wrote a book about it called 
Brain on Fire: My Month of Madness

unexplained-events:

unexplained-events:

Autoimmune Disease Acts Like Demonic Possession

Susannah Cahalan started feeling a bit off. Numbness on one side of the body, losing sleep, crying hysterically one minute and laughing the next. She went to get MRIs but they showed nothing. Things were getting a bit more strange.

Her boyfriend told her how at one point while they were watching a show together she started grinding her teeth, moaning, and biting her tongue until she finally passed out. He took her to the hospital and they found out it was a seizure. Her first of many. Things got worse.

She stopped eating, became paranoid and delusional, had more seizures in which blood would spurt out of her mouth. She was hospitalized (one nurse recalls that in the middle of the night while she was getting blood, Susannah sat up straigh and slapped her). Numerous tests were done and the doctors couldn’t figure out what was wrong.

That is until Dr. Souhel Najjar came into the picture. He asked her to draw a clock. When she showed him what she had drawn he knew exactly what was wrong with her. All the numbers were written on the right side of the clock face, and no numbers were on the left side.

She had anti-NMDAR encephalitis. The receptors in the frontal lobe, responsible for cognitive reasoning, and the limbic system, or the emotional center of the brain, are under assault by the immune system. In other words, her body was attacking her brain. Nearly 90% of people that suffer from this go undiagnosed and it is more common in women.

SOURCE

SOURCE

Oh, and she wrote a book about it called 

Brain on Fire: My Month of Madness

acamazingucsd:

Say hello to Acamazing 2014-2015!

We are very excited to welcome our newest members and can’t wait to see what this year has in store for all of us!

can’t not reblog this ahh

acamazingucsd:

We are back at it again! Come join UCSD’s Nine A Cappella groups for an awesome night of music on Wednesday, October 1st at the Price Center East Ballroom. Doors will open at 7 and it is FREE!!
The performing groups this year are:The UCSD Tritones: http://www.ucsdtritones.com/auditionThe Beat @ UCSD http://www.theucsdbeat.com/UCSD Acamazing: http://acamazing.ucsd.edu/UCSD Daughters of Triton: http://dots.ucsd.edu/The Treble Singers at UCSD: http://thetreblesingers.ucsd.edu/UCSD Frequency: http://frequency.ucsd.edu/UCSD Duly Noted: http://dulynoted.ucsd.edu/UCSD Sitaare- South Asian A Cappella: https://www.facebook.com/UCSD.SitaareSelah UCSD A Cappella: https://www.facebook.com/selahacappella

Thanks to The UCSD Tritones for coordinating this event! Click here for more details! 

acamazingucsd:

We are back at it again! Come join UCSD’s Nine A Cappella groups for an awesome night of music on Wednesday, October 1st at the Price Center East Ballroom. Doors will open at 7 and it is FREE!!

The performing groups this year are:
The UCSD Tritoneshttp://www.ucsdtritones.com/audition
The Beat @ UCSD http://www.theucsdbeat.com/
UCSD Acamazinghttp://acamazing.ucsd.edu/
UCSD Daughters of Tritonhttp://dots.ucsd.edu/
The Treble Singers at UCSDhttp://thetreblesingers.ucsd.edu/
UCSD Frequencyhttp://frequency.ucsd.edu/
UCSD Duly Notedhttp://dulynoted.ucsd.edu/
UCSD Sitaare- South Asian A Cappellahttps://www.facebook.com/UCSD.Sitaare
Selah UCSD A Cappellahttps://www.facebook.com/selahacappella

Thanks to The UCSD Tritones for coordinating this event! Click here for more details! 

neuromorphogenesis:

The Truth About Pavlov’s Dogs Is Pretty Disturbing

Pavlov’s dogs made their name in psychology classrooms, but should probably be more famous for their physiology. A Pavlovian response is a physical, not psychological, reaction. And it’s possible that that physical reaction is causing people to overdose on drugs in a very unexpected way.

The Real Story of Pavlov’s Dogs

When did Pavlov’s dogs start salivating? When they heard a bell, you say? Au contraire. Pavlov’s dogs started salivating when they saw lab coats. Workers at a lab that studied digestion noticed that the dogs used in the experiments were drooling for seemingly no reason at all.

It was only Ivan Pavlov, a scientist working at the lab, who made the connection between the lab coats and the drool. The dogs, Pavlov reasoned, knew that they were soon going to be fed whenever they saw a lab coat. What intrigued Pavlov was the fact that a physical response could be produced solely by way of a mental association. The dogs couldn’t drool on command consciously, but they could be trained to do so just the same.

That’s when Pavlov went to work with meat, dogs, and bells, and did the controlled experiment that earned him fame and fortune. He won a Nobel Prize in Medicine and Physiology for his research, but most of us hear about his famous experiment when we study psychology, not medicine. Once the Pavlovian response became a metaphor for an unthinking popular response to stimulus, it was divorced, in the public consciousness, from the physical reality. It shouldn’t have been. The mind, when exposed to certain input, can prime the body into a specific state of physical readiness. This has physical, not just social or psychological, consequences.

Pavlovian Response and Drug Overdose

There are a limited amount of places where one can do drugs. Of those places, drug users select a certain few places where they prefer to do drugs, and then do drugs most often at a select number of places that are convenient. Essentially, a regular drug user will often have a regular place to take their drugs. After they’ve done drugs regularly in the same place, the connection is made. A bathroom, a bedroom, a certain club, will always be associated with drug use. People trying to quit drugs often talk about how they have to avoid their old haunts, because they feel a rush of anticipation. That rush is not just mental.

Scientists learned that putting a dog in a certain injection booth every day and injecting it with adrenaline produced a dog with bradycardia - a dangerously slow heartbeat - when they put the dog in the same booth but only injected it with a placebo. The dog’s body was compensating for the adrenaline it anticipated. It was trying to reduce the dangerous effects of the adrenaline by slowing down the dog’s heartbeat.

A drug user’s body does the same. Over time people build up a tolerance for the drug, not just because the body manages to deal with the drug when it’s in their system, but because the body knows to prepare for the drug before it has been administered. When a person who has built up a tolerance for a drug in a certain place goes somewhere new, the body may not know what’s coming to it, and that tolerance is greatly reduced.

In one experiment, scientists studied rats who had been given regular doses of heroin. Some of the rats were taken to a new area and given a larger dose of heroin. The others were injected with the larger dose, but kept in their regular environment. The mortality rate of the rats injected in a new environment was twice that of the rats injected in the familiar environment. No similar experiment of human drug users would be conscionable, but a survey of the survivors of heroin overdoses found that seven out of ten were in a new place when they overdosed.

Even the most basic functions our bodies perform are marvels of biochemistry. When the dogs salivated, they were releasing chemicals that would help them process their food. The biochemistry involving drugs is more complicated, and more vital, than digestion. When we’re not careful, we can unwittingly train ourselves into Pavlovian responses that are dangerous to ignore.

[Via Pavlovian Conditioning and Drug Overdose: When Tolerance FailsThe Correlation Between Drug Tolerance and the Environment.]

zimbreezy:

100. Days of Summer

zimbreezy:

100. Days of Summer

polaroidsf:

Surfers at Ocean Beach.

polaroidsf:

Surfers at Ocean Beach.

zimbreezy:

90. Lived here for three years and haven’t tried surfing until now… better late than never!

Shamelessly reblogging myself~
It really has been a beautiful summer. 

zimbreezy:

90. Lived here for three years and haven’t tried surfing until now… better late than never!

Shamelessly reblogging myself~

It really has been a beautiful summer. 

She Was Mine, ~ 5 years later…


polaroidsf:

Sunset on Municipal Pier.

polaroidsf:

Sunset on Municipal Pier.

I love science, and it pains me to think that so many are terrified of the subject or feel that choosing science means you cannot also choose compassion, or the arts, or be awed by nature. Science is not meant to cure us of mystery, but to reinvent and reinvigorate it.
- Robert M. Sapolsky (via pridejoyetc)

(Source: utcjonesobservatory)


polaroidsf:

Street swimming.

polaroidsf:

Street swimming.

polaroidsf:

Noe Valley’s rainbow house.

polaroidsf:

Noe Valley’s rainbow house.

polaroidsf:

Summer + SF = FOG

polaroidsf:

Summer + SF = FOG